Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Story Board Film Project at Multiverse Masters Virtual World on Kitley





Introduction:
In re-purposing the Federal Consortium for Virtual Worlds (FCVW) lobby, that was used to introduce new users on how to maneuver within the virtual environment during the 2015 FCVW conference, I analyzed the section that was set up with four slides to introduce camera controls and considered how I could turn it into a group project. The learning objectives would be as follows.








Camera Controls:

Participants will review key features of the camera tool in Open Simulator. The following features will be reviewed, For new users the Quick Start Guide for Using a Kitely Virtual Reality Island at https://multiversemasters.blogspot.com/2019/04/quick-start-guide-for-using-kitely.html will be provided. Participants will learn camera controls in the virtual word for looking and zooming, by reading slides in the virtual world. The participants will learn how to view objects and zoom, and how to use the - keyboard and mouse controls. The participants will learn camera control for taking a snapshot in the virtual world. The participants will learn the camera control for mouse look in the virtual world. For advanced users the lesson plan can include a comparison of different world viewers as they relate to these tools.

This gives an adaptable approach to three levels of students for customization of the curriculum and is beneficial when creating groups. Groups can be created based on levels of ability or mixed specifically to blend levels for the benefit of the group activity. The level of the student can be determined during the pre-reflective aspect of the course.

Participants will be using a virtual world viewer to access assigned tasks and resource materials. They will need to access the Kitely grid and will be provided with a document with instructions on how to access multiverse masters on that grid. Participants will be asked to participate in at least five discussion groups in world to introduce themselves, complete a group project and to reflect on the goals learned.

The initial in world live meeting and discussion group and introductions is where participants will introduce themselves and offer any experience they have had working with Open Simulators and Virtual Worlds. In addition, participants will share how they will use this information in their personal or professional goals. Supports within the virtual world will direct participants to a slide show instruction on where to go inside the virtual world to find the different tools they will use and the assignments. This slide show will be used as the initial demonstrating source and will also be located on the supporting website. The participants can review this and all other supports at will. This will encourage repetition and formative learning opportunities.







Participants will have access to links that are created in the virtual world to supplemental resources for participants on each of the defined goals. A second live meeting and discussion group in the virtual world allows participants to reflect on goals learned using the virtual world and website supports and reflect on the group project. Participants may share how they can relate and use these features in their personal and professional goals, any challenges or features they did not understand and respond to at least two of their colleague’s postings in the virtual world chat. This is beneficial since the instructor can save the chat dialog, as can the participants for future reflection.

During this second group meeting, tasks are assigned within the virtual world that can be done independently or with partners and as a group. This allows participant choice and flexibility based on learning styles and student resources such as time. The groups are formed at this time to conduct live meetings without the instructor present to complete a collaborative project. The groups can be chosen by the instructor based on the student’s abilities as shown in the first and second meeting, their preferred time zones, and other relevant factors. This group project will exemplify the different tools and techniques learned in camera controls within virtual worlds.

Three live meetings will be required by each group and other communications needed to complete the project.  Each group member will be responsible for completing their own summary report of each live meeting including attendance. Each member will be responsible for completing a peer evaluation which will be assigned by the instructor. Each group member will be responsible for submitting the culminated project. By requiring these assignments from each group member, the instructor will get a complete picture and can compare the evaluations of each student as well as the peer evaluations of each student to best analyze the successful outcome of the lesson.

Participants are assigned tasks within the virtual world, for example, each participant will be required to submit camera shots taken showcasing the use of each of the features discussed in the camera shop module. Various suggested options will be provided in the virtual world to increase interest and participation. Additional options are encouraged as approved by the instructor.






Rubric:

Goal one:

Complete the four camera control activities. 1. Camera control and zooming 2. View objects and zoom 3. Camera control snap shots 4. Camera control mouse look. For each of these assignments provide a snapshot of your screen, titled with your name and the activity number.

1 point Provided at least one snapshot. 2 points Provided 2-4 snapshots that did not clearly reflect the learning goals. 3 points Provided 2-4 snapshots -2 of which clearly reflect the learning goals. 4 points Provided 3-4 snapshots of which 3 clearly reflect the learning goals. 5 points Provided 4 snapshots of which all 4 clearly reflect the learning goals.

Goal two:

Take 5 unique snapshots showing the camera control skills learned using unique angles and zoom lengths. These snapshots will be part of the group project and story board.

1 point Provided at least one snapshot. 2 points Provided at least two snapshot that showed unique angles and zoom ratios. 3 points Provided at least three snapshot that showed unique angles and zoom ratios. 4 points Provided at least four snapshot that showed unique angles and zoom ratios. 5 points Provided at least five snapshot that showed unique angles and zoom ratios

Goal three:

Two class live in world meetings, introduction, discussion, culmination and reflection. The chat transcript can be saved by the instructor to gauge level of participation. Participants will be expected to respond in chat to at least two of their classmates’ posts.

1 point for each meeting totaling 2 points Participant attends the meeting but does not engage in the discussion. 2 points for each meeting totaling 4 points Participant engages in the discussion. But does not give feedback. 3 points for each meeting totaling 6 points Participant gives feedback but does not engage in the initial discussion. 4 points for each meeting totaling 8 points participant engages in the discussion but only responds to one classmate in the chat. 5 points for each meeting totaling 10 points Participants engages in the discussion and responds to two other classmates in the chat.

Goal four:

Two project-based group discussions. Using a note-card and the drop function of the in the virtual world mailbox participants must reflect on how the information was received in each of these two project discussion groups, how the information can be applied, and any misunderstandings. Participants are asked to give peer feedback to at least one group member. This peer will be assigned by the instructor and a copy of the feedback submission will be provided to the instructor via note-card in the drop box.

1 point for each group discussion meeting totaling 2 points Participants attended the meeting. 2 points for each meeting totaling 4 points Participants attended the meeting and submitted a note-card that clearly reflected at least one of the goals of the assignment but did not submit peer feedback. 3 points for each meeting totaling 6 points Participants attended the meeting and submitted a note-card that clearly reflected on at least one assignment goal and submitted peer feedback. 4 points for each meeting totaling 8 points Participants attended the meeting and submitted a note-card that clearly reflected on all the goals of the assignment. but did not submit peer feedback. 5 points for each meeting totaling 10 points Participants attended the meeting and submitted a note-card that clearly reflected on all the goals of the assignment. and submitted peer feedback

Goal five:

Reflection and final project feedback with live meeting. There will be two forms of anonymous peer feedback options One will be a vote and a badge awarded for the best project. The second will be an evaluation of how the group performed submitted to the instructor via a note=card dropped in the mailbox in-world. There will be two options for non-anonymous peer feedback, where each participant will evaluate the work and participation of one group member to provide to that group member and provide to the instructor. There will be an opportunity throughout the course to vote on whether the assignment goals are understood. This will give immediate feedback to the instructor on the need to clarify goals.

5 - 10 points Participant engages in one of the five feedback opportunities based on quality of feedback. 11-20 points Participant engages in two of the five feedback opportunities based on quality of feedback. 21-30 points Participant engages in three of the five feedback opportunities based on quality of the feedback. 31-40 points Participant Participates engages in four of the five feedback opportunities Based on the quality of the feedback. 41-50 points Participant engages in all five feedback opportunities based on the quality of the feedback. A grading rubric details all the necessary requirements of the project. Based on outcome, the instructor will be able to assess if learning was successful.
·         5 points for camera control activities
·         10 points for quiz ( 1 point per question, ten questions total)
·         5 points for snapshots for group project
·         10 points 2 class meetings
·         10 points 2 project group meetings
·         10 points peer feedback (graded by peer evaluation)
·         50 points reflection and final project feedback participation.
In the assessment plan I choose the criteria based on pre-activity reflection, so participants could process before hand what they already knew and hoped to learn. I used participation as a heavy factor in determining assessment outcome to encourage peer led learning and feedback, especially peer feedback was also important. This, again, was to encourage group participation and peer led learning. In the assessment I wanted to include both summative and formative techniques, relying heavier on formative due to their benefits in group activities and continued lifelong learning skills.

The Formative Assessment will include a self-assessment of the participants understanding of how virtual world skills can be learned, taught and assessed within the virtual world. This can be compared to the follow up self-assessment at the end of the story board film simulation.

The initial introduction discussion task allows the participants to share a little about themselves and how they may be using
the virtual world environment in their personal or career goals. The basis for this task is to begin building a community for collaboration. It permits participants to get to know each other, see what they are thinking, and find any potential similarities they could build on. Further, this task allows the instructor to see how participants are using the virtual world and any prior knowledge they may have on the subject. The introductions will assist in determining participant level within the virtual world and adapt the course as needed to best serve the participant’s needs (e.g., new, beginning, or advanced).

Participants are required to participate in the introduction discussion. This meeting will be recorded by the instructor and a link provided to the participants for review. Participants will be asked to introduce themselves during this initial discussion, by posting their goals and their experiences in the in the virtual world chat. The chat transcript can be saved by the instructor to gauge level of participation. Participants will be expected to respond in chat to at least two of their classmates’ posts. This meeting will be recorded. The recording of the discussion group offers insight for the instructor on how the information was received, how the participant sees the information being applied, and any misunderstandings that are missed during the live meeting. By sharing a link to the video of the discussion group, this encourages the participants to synthesize goals learned to strengthen meaning.

The live meet in this environment continue to build the community and stimulate peer support/feedback. The requirement will be for project groups to meet for a minimum of two group discussions Communication received through the in the virtual world messaging system will also allow the instructor to be able to provide feedback during the group projects.
Participants are required to participate in these two project-based group discussions. Using a note-card and the drop function of the in the virtual world mailbox participants must reflect on how the information was received in each of these project discussion groups, how the information can be applied, and any misunderstandings. Participants are asked to give peer feedback to at least one group member. This peer will be assigned by the instructor and a copy of the feedback submission will be provided to the instructor via note-card in the drop box. This will include a 10-point anonymous peer evaluation provided to the instructor.
Because peer assessment will be a major factor, Peer rubrics will be provided to the students. An example of a peer rubric would look something like this. For this example, it would have more detail to encourage feedback, and could be supplied anonymously to the peer or for the instructor only.

On a scale of 1-10 how would you rate the level of participation and collaboration of your peer? 1 being peer did not participate or meet expectations and 10 being peer exceeded expectations with participation and support.

There will be an opportunity throughout the course to vote on whether the assignment goals are understood. This will give immediate feedback to the instructor on the need to clarify goals. The introduction and culminating live meetings are forums for the instructor to assess how everyone understands the goals as well as to go over any remaining misunderstandings. These meetings are an opportunity for the participants to receive live instruction, clarification of goals, and time to reflect with instructor and peer feedback, on ways to apply the features of the virtual world viewer camera controls to personal and professional goals and projects. The live meetings build community. Participants will be expected to respond to at least two other participants comments in chat in the virtual world.

Peer voting will be used to encourage creativity in the assignment and assist the participants with understanding how to assess virtual world learning. Peer feedback will also be submitted to paired participants through the in the virtual world messaging system and dropped via a note-card in the in the virtual world mailbox.

Participants are required to participate in live meetings and the peer feedback activities. Each participant will have time to address peers and offer feedback anonymously and in person. There will be two forms of anonymous peer feedback options One will be a vote and a badge awarded for the best project. The second will be an evaluation of how the group performed submitted to the instructor via a note-card dropped in the mailbox int the virtual world. There will be two options for non-anonymous peer feedback, where each participant will evaluate the work and participation of one group member to provide to that group member and provide to the instructor. The instructor will be able to gauge interest and understanding by each participant’s participation and feedback.

The Summative Assessment will include the completion of tasks assigned within the virtual world. The final project captures the knowledge learned by allowing each participant to produce their own snapshots using the features discussed.  Participants will have the opportunity to create a story board film project using the snapshots as a group (or individually with instructor permission).



Monday, April 15, 2019

Quick Start Guide for Using a Kitely Virtual Reality Island






Quick Start Guide for Using a Kitely Virtual Reality Island
n  GET AVATAR:  go to www.kitely.com and click Create Account or Sign In > complete the information, including reading the Terms of Agreement; gather your sign in information from the method chosen  NOTE: keep track of your avatar name and password; no one can reset this for you1-min video   https://youtu.be/NabtMAEYPNI 
n  GET VIEWER:  go to www.firestormviewer.org/downloads/ > choose your operating system > choose one of the download options THAT HAS OPENSIM in the name > follow instructions to put it on your computer – 45-sec video  http://youtu.be/TTFbcovfO-c?hd=1   ; the viewer is downloaded to your computer
n  GO TO LOCATION DIRECTLY:  to visit any Kitely island you:  open the Firestorm viewer on your computer by clicking its icon > in the viewer window, type avatar first and last name > click the drop-down arrow for Grid, and select Kitely > type the name of the island to be visited (if you leave this blank you will go to the Kitely Welcome Center the first time) > click Login and within about 45 seconds to two minutes (depending on the Island size) you are brought to the island – 1 min video   https://youtu.be/vJFoPDkWqDU  (Marian Island is often used for a SUNY starting point. For this activity visit Multiverse Masters)
n  Or, CHANGE TO A DIFFERENT ISLAND:  if you want to get to a different island, once you are on a Kitely island, click on the Map icon on the bottom of the Kitely window > type name of desired island in the Find textbook > click Find > once the island appears, (Multiverse Masters) click Teleport – 1 min video  https://youtu.be/MkElWmk2kLo 
n  USE SPEECH AND TEXT:  to have your avatar speak, you click-on the small-box in the top right of the microphone icon on the bottom of the screen (a check mark is added) and then you click on and off the larger microphone icon itself to speak (you click this icon off when you do not want to speak to prevent audio feedback within the virtual space);  to use text, type in the text-entry, chat space on the bottom left > press Enter – 1 min video  http://youtu.be/1l0PtPwtpz8?hd=1 
n  ADJUST SPEECH, if necessary: if you do not see green waves come out of your avatar’s head when you try to speak, on the top menu, click Avatar > Preferences > Sound and Media > click the Voice tab in the middle top of the dialog box > testing the Audio Device Settings features until you select the right device > click OK – 1-min video  http://youtu.be/UZebuDCgvj8?hd=1 
n  MOVE YOUR AVATAR:   move avatar using the arrow keys on your keyboard or by using the Walk/ Run / Fly icon on screen bottom where you first select whether to walk, run or fly and then determine the direction; you can teleport too, which is not reviewed here – 1-min video  http://youtu.be/KxH_hLQtqAE?hd=1 
n  CHANGE YOUR AVATAR’S VIEW:  hold Alt on the keyboard > cursor becomes a magnifying glass > click on a distance item & with Alt still held scroll in/out with mouse to zoom in/out; and/or click Avatar (on top menu) > click-on Camera controls > use camera wheel to change views – 1 min video  http://youtu.be/adPRg8bMaAI?hd=1 
n  TAKE SNAPSHOT:  click Snapshot icon on screen bottom > to save on your computer, click Save on disk > browse to desired location  > select image type > click OK – 1 min video   http://youtu.be/BYQDLqOBwV4?hd=1 
n  SIT ON OBJECTS: right click on chairs and other object > select Sit Here - .5 min video  http://youtu.be/spuyKPZgHRQ?hd=1 
n  MANY MORE OPTIONS:  This Quick Start Guide only highlights the most salient of many features, from avatar customization to instant messaging, that are available.   Experiment by reviewing the menus and testing the effect on your avatar, by going to the Kitely Welcome island, by learning within your course activities, and/or using this more advanced guide to consider other features.   However, for most classes, you are only going to be using the virtual-reality spaces as meeting spaces without using any of the many advanced features.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Edutopia 1 and Edutopia 2 on the Kitely grid Evaluation of the learning environment as well as the support website SLESL.net
By Salie Davis

Edutopia 1 and Edutopia 2 is located on the Kitely Grid  at https://www.kitely.com/virtual-world/Barbara-Novelli/Edutopia-1  and https://www.kitely.com/virtual-world/Barbara-Novelli/Edutopia-2  Classes have historically been held inside the Second Life grid.

The support website is www.SLESL.net. This site has surveys and pre-tests to help place the student.


The landing Zone and boot camp area is designed to help the student become comfortable with the learning environment.

It has been proven that the way in which learning material is presented, what technology is used, can increase or decrease testing outcomes based on the comfort level of the student in using the technology.



The navigation area for Edutopia 2 is more developed than Edutopia 1. Edutopia 1 relies on important links communicated to the student for meet up areas. The design for Edutopia 1 is compact lessons and small projects. Edutopia 2 is for deep immersion, mysteries and role play stories.

Edutopia 1 has more educational props, slide shows, presentations, materials and supplies, and small project instructions.
Outside of the virtual world is website supports and additional options such as Skype meetings. Gamification in learning environments has become more popular in the last decade. Playing games is fun. The enjoyment of the learning process motivates students to learn. Increased engagement is essential when developing curriculum plans. Edutopia uses games, socialization, open explorations, and the opportunity to create to increase engagement.
The lessons are set up so that they can be done independently, one on one, or in small and/or large groups. The individual circumstances vary. The student body for Edutopia may involve individuals from across the globe, speaking different languages and different cultures. Having flexible paths for learning ensures that the widest audience is served. An important note acknowledged on the web site is that due to the limitations of the environment, class sizes larger than 10 students is not recommended. For language immersion you want the students to do more talking than the instructor. The virtual environment has been used for education of large numbers however the success of this has been when audio communications were turned off, allowing for text only and the teacher or panel presented in a lecture format. This type of format though able to support large numbers of students is not conducive to language learning.
Non-player characters (NPC’s) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) is used to increase the immersion and engagement of learners. As technology continues to advance new ways to increase the impact and effectiveness of immersive learning evolve. Currently to participate in this virtual world environment requires a virtual world viewer. Currently in development are walk in 3D web pages. In addition, technology is being improved to increase the quality of using 3d glasses when entering these environments. At this time it is not a feasible format for 3D glasses due to lag which increases motion sickness.
Smaller examples of simulations, role play, and immersion exist on Edutopia 1.  These two worlds allow for learners at different language levels, comfort levels and learning styles. Especially with peer evaluation it can be useful to group like peers together when they are complimented by similar learning styles and levels of learning. In the same factor, pairing students at different levels can also increase the opportunity to improve peer tutoring skills.


Gamification and making learning fun and engaging is a primary motivator for learning. Distance courses are enhanced using virtual reality, adding layers beneficial to different learning styles. According to SLESL.net there are eight types of intelligence identified by Howard Gardner. These include: Verbal linguistic, Logical mathematical, Visual spatial, Musical rhythmic, Bodily kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Interpersonal and Naturalistic learners.

Creative hands on activities increase engagement. With a wide variety of options available the lesson plans also allow for autonomy by allowing the student flexibility in the assignments and areas they visit and the tasks they complete. This increases the motivation of the student, making them more vested in the direction their learning takes.

Tests are included and are designed so that they can be evaluated by peers or by the individual themselves.

Assessment is based on participation and the successful completion of tasks.

For individual interactions, note cards, screen shots, and other assignments are used for assessment of participation.



Edutopia 1 also includes guides for peer assessments. Except for badge awards, this is the extent of assessments that are built into this environment located at Kitely.com from an observational overview. For more formalized assessment it appears that the student must seek out third party testing for language proficiency. The only concern noted in analyzing this learning environment is the fact that it is a paid service with no outcome in assessment or grading. The website does offer suggested third-party tests and is working towards partnerships with colleges, however as of this assessment the outcome appears to be measured by participant satisfaction. The website does offer individualized course design to fulfill any standardized requirements with additional fees applied for the development of said courses. *Update from the creator, "My latest work includes more than 400 items on the Kitely Marketplace and that many more items still to add.  On Edutopia 2, I also finished building out all the Harry Potter Lane stores.

With regards to testing and grades, if I work with a university, there are course assignments, tests, and grades.  I put my tests on Quia.com to make them accessible around the world."



The most exciting thing about these environments are that they are always improving. It is worth checking out online and in-world. 



















Monday, March 25, 2019

Motivational tools, tips and tricks

Who doesn't want to motivate students? I have created several trophy tools that are inexpensive on the kitely market place or free when available on Multiverse Masters.



Here is the the Multiverse Masters Kitely Market store.
https://www.kitely.com/market?store=46870914&wt=os

Below is a video showing how to edit the trophies for your own needs.